Posted in Applying for a mortgage - Lisa Alentejano services the interior, Bank VS Broker, BC Mortgages, Canadian Housing Market - Lisa Alentejano, Canadian Mortgage News, Credit Scores, First Time Home Buyer Steps, fixed or variable rate or both, Fixed rates, Hombuyers Downpayment, Home Buyer Closing Costs, Home Loans, Interior home mortgage, Interior Mortgage Expert - Lisa Alentejano, Interior Mortgages, kelowna mortgage, Kelowna Mortgage Broker, Kelowna Mortgage Financing - Lisa Alentejano, Low Interest Rates, Mortgage Affordability, Mortgage by Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Playground - Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Consultant, Mortgage Rates, Protecting your biggest investment your mortgage, rate fixed mortgage, Save your money, Why use a mortgage broker

BANK VS BROKER

Buying your first home and getting your first mortgage can be an overwhelming experience.

If this is your first home buying experiencing, applying for a mortgage can be the most intimidating part of the process , so where do you start?

In the past, the home buyer turned to their banks for their mortgage needs, but now you have more options at your disposal with over 40% of consumers turning to mortgage brokers for their mortgages needs instead of the banks.

Mortgage brokers are provincially licensed and regulated by CMBA .   They can help you with all aspects of a mortgage, from figuring out how much you can truly afford, to determining the best mortgage product for you, to finding ways to save you money and pay off your mortgage faster.

Many lenders’ rates and mortgages can only be accessed through a mortgage broker. Not having the selection of lenders, and simply choosing to get a mortgage with a bank, can mean choosing harsher prepayment penalties for breaking your mortgage in the future, as well as a higher interest rate; which can cost buyers thousands upon thousands of dollars over the life of their mortgage.

A mortgage broker is also able to better tailor a mortgage product to your specific needs, whether that be working with a lender who is more flexible when it comes to self-employed income; one who has more flexible prepayment terms; or one that has more options for consumers that possibly have suffered some credit challenges in the past.  Because mortgage brokers have access to more lenders, they’re better able to find a lender and a mortgage based on your specific needs and financial situation to get you the lowest mortgage rates today.

Mortgage brokers offer convenience, which lets you meet around your schedule, not the banks hours.

Mortgage brokers also operate on commission and are paid by the lenders who ultimately grant you your mortgage, so there is no cost to the consumer.   Referrals are the life blood of our business so it is in our best interest to serve you as best we can.

Bottom line,  using a mortgage broker gives you the freedom of CHOICE and comparables to consider, using a bank gives you no other choice but ONE, theirs.

Feel free to contact me with any questions you may have at 1-888-819-6536 or lisa@mortgageplayground.com

 

Posted in advice on locking in your mortgage, Bank of Canada, Bank of canada rates, BC Mortgages, Benchmark interest rate, Canadian Mortgage News, fixed or variable rate or both, Fixed rates, fixed term mortgages, Home Loans, Interest \rate Increases, Interior Mortgage Expert - Lisa Alentejano, kelowna mortgage, Kelowna Mortgage Broker, Kelowna Mortgage Financing - Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Rates, Pre Approval Mortgage, rate fixed mortgage

FIXED VS VARIABLE MORTGAGES

THINGS TO CONSIDER

Fixed and Variable rate mortgages both have their advantages and disadvantages!

Historically speaking, homeowners tend to pay lower rates with variable mortgages, but these mortgages are also vulnerable to fluctuations because they’re tied to the Bank
of Canada’s prime rate (which is announced eight times per year). Fixed rates, on the other hand are primarily influenced by the yield on Canadian government bonds (bond yields) , and are typically higher than variable rates, but their rate is consistent throughout the term of the mortgage. Below are a few questions to help you determine which type
of mortgage is right for you.

CAN I AFFORD TO TAKE A VARIABLE RATE MORTGAGE

There is some risk associated with variable rate mortgages, so if  you go this route, you must be able to mitigate the risk if rates do rise.  One method of protecting yourself involves setting your payment to a fixed amount that’s higher than the minimum requirement.  For example, setting your payments based on the current 5 year fixed rate will allow you to provide a buffer in the event that rates rise and, because you’re paying more than the minimum amount, you’ll be paying more of your principal as well.

DOES A VARIABLE RATE MORTGAGE FIT MY RISK PROFILE?

Once you have decided you can afford a variable rate mortgage,  the next thing to assess is whether a variable rate mortgage fits your personality, lifestyle and comfort zone. If you’re the type of person that can’t sleep at night knowing that your rate and payment may change by 0.25%, then a variable rate mortgage may not be the best option for you.

WHAT TYPE OF VARIABLE RATE MORTGAGE SHOULD I CHOOSE?

There are three main factors to consider when choosing a variable rate mortgage:

  1. Payment frequency – Make sure you are aware of the options available before deciding. Some lenders may not allow certain variations of payment frequency (i.e.accelerated biweekly or weekly payments).
  2. Rate changes – Some lenders change their variable rates in line with the Bank of Canada eight times per year while others do it quarterly.
  3. Conversion to fixed rate – Does the lender allow the mortgage to be converted to a fixed rate mortgage at anytime? If so, what rate are you guaranteed on conversion – the best discounted rate or the posted rate?

If you would like to discuss all of your options in detail please contact me directly at 250-819-6536 or 1-888-819-6536 or email me at lisa@mortgageplayground.com

Lisa Alentejano

Posted in BC Mortgages, BCMortgage, Benchmark interest rate, Best Rate Mortgages, British Columbia Mortgages, buy vs rent for students, Canadian Economy, Canadian Housing Market - Lisa Alentejano, First Time Home Buyer Steps, fixed or variable rate or both, Fixed rates, fixed term mortgages, Hombuyers Downpayment, Home Equity, Interior Mortgages, Jim Flaherty, Kamloops broker, Kamloops mortgage consultant, Low Interest Rates, Mortgage Affordability, Mortgage Rates, new mortgage rules canada, Protecting your biggest investment your mortgage, rate fixed mortgage, Refinance Your Mortgage, Refinancing, Renewing your mortgage, Why use a mortgage broker

TD, RBC End 2.99% Mortgage Deals Early

After a crazy month fielding calls about rates and competitive rates from the major banks, they have put a hault on them.  Although the product that were attached with them were limited and badly disclosed to consumers, there are still amazing rates to be had in the mortgage market.  The problem with banks is that they can choose to give one rate today and a different rate tomorrow.  All I can suggest be informed and do your homework and ask questions when shopping for a mortgage.  Its not always about rate its about having a mortgage plan that suits your needs and someone that can show you ways to save money on your mortgage long term!  If your interested in learning more about how to save money on your mortgage , no tricks no catch good ole information for you from me  http://bit.ly/AfD2RR    Here’s the article below;

After briefly offering record-low rates of less than 3% on some of its mortgages in response to its rivals, Canada’s two biggest banks have pulled back their offers prematurely.

Toronto-Dominion Bank, Canada’s second-largest bank, raised its special four-year closed fixed rate mortgage 40 basis points to 3.39%, effective Wednesday, while also introducing a special five-year closed fixed rate mortgage at 4.04%.

The bank also hiked its five-year closed mortgage 10 basis points to 5.24%.

TD had said it would offer the special rates until Feb. 29.

The moves put TD back in line with Royal Bank of Canada, which made the same rate decisions on Monday, coming into effect Wednesday.

RBC had also initially planned to keep its special rates available until Feb. 29

 

The only difference is RBC already had the special five-year closed fixed rate mortgage product, which it increased 10 basis points to 4.04%.

RBC had first cut its rate to 2.99% in January in response to a similar cut from BMO.

Matt Gierasimczuk, a spokesman with RBC, said the bank had to end its special prematurely because of rising funding costs.

“Our long-term funding costs have gone up considerably due to global economic concerns and, while we have held off in passing on these rate changes to our clients, it is now necessary for us to increase this mortgage rate,” he said in an interview with Bloomberg News on Monday.

With household debt-to-income ratios at at historic highs and still on the rise, the Bank of Canada has repeatedly voiced its concerns over the past year that Canadians are living beyond their means.

“We have expressed on numerous occasions our concerns about rising household indebtedness,” senior deputy governor Tiff Macklem said in a question-and-answer session following a speech in Toronto Tuesday. “The simple fact is that consumers are consuming more than they’re earning.”

With files from Reuters and Bloomberg News

Posted in advice on locking in your mortgage, Bank of Canada, Bank of canada rates, BC Mortgages, Best Rate Mortgages, Canadian Economy, Canadian Mortgage News, Debt, fixed or variable rate or both, Fixed rates, Interest \rate Increases, Jim Flaherty, Kamloops broker, Kamloops First Time Home Buyer Tips, kamloops mortgage, Kamloops Mortgage Broker, Kamloops mortgage consultant, kamloops mortgage financing, Kamloops Mortgages, Kelowna Mortgage Broker, Kelowna Mortgage Financing - Lisa Alentejano, Low Interest Rates, mark carney, Mortgage Affordability, Mortgage Broker Kamloops, mortgage financing kamloops, Mortgage Language, Mortgage Rates, Mortgages - Get a second opinion, paying a penalty to break my mortgage, Pre Approval Mortgage, Protecting your biggest investment your mortgage, rate fixed mortgage, Real Estate Market, Refinance Your Mortgage, Renewing your mortgage, salmon Arm mortgages, should you lock in your mortgage, variable rate mortgages, Vernon Mortgage, Why use a mortgage broker

Mortgage Rates – How to protect yourself when they increase – Video message!

Heres a video I personally did on how to take a proative approach to protect and prepare yourself with rising interest rates in the future and save thousands of dollars! Click below to view video

Inflation Hedge Strategy - Learn to protect yourself from rising rates

Lisa Alentejano

Posted in advice on locking in your mortgage, Bank of Canada, BC Mortgages, Benchmark interest rate, Best Rate Mortgages, fixed or variable rate or both, Fixed rates, Kamloops broker, Low Interest Rates, mark carney, Mortgage Affordability, rate fixed mortgage, variable rate mortgages, Variable rates

Increase to Variable Rate Mortgages

Why could I get Prime minus .90 last week and today it is Prime minus .25?– A great question, says the Mortgage Brokers Association of BC (MBABC), especially when fixed interest mortgage rates are remaining the same.  The quick answer?  As with many things, it all boils down to money.

Over the last couple of months, banks and other lenders have been offering historically low variable interest rates to qualified homebuyers in an effort to attract new clients and mortgage business.  In the short term, lenders have been prepared to accept these low profit margins with the knowledge that, as the prime rate inevitably rises, so too will their profit on variable mortgages – a similar ‘loss leader’ tactic used by retailers to get consumers into their door.

“However”, says Geoff Parkin, MBABC’s president, “the recent announcement by Bank of Canada governor, Mark Carney has changed the mortgage lending landscape.”   Carney stated that, because of poor performing global markets and continuing economic uncertainty, the benchmark interest rate would remain unchanged.  The long-term outlook indicates continuing low fixed interest rates with no significant increases to the Prime rate.  “In a nutshell”, says Parkin, “the bank’s theory of anticipating rising profits on variable rates was proven wrong.  They’ve had to quickly respond to this situation by reducing the variable rate discount in order to gain back profit.”

What does this mean for consumers who have variable rate mortgages?  Much of the same, says Parkin.  “We continue to see low fixed rates and the variable rate is under 3.0%.  There may still be value in going variable over fixed, but because consumers all have different financial situations and mortgage needs, we recommend they obtain expert financial advice from their MBABC mortgage broker.”

Posted in Bank of Canada, Bank of canada rates, British Columbia Mortgages, mark carney, Mortgage Broker Kamloops, rate fixed mortgage

Bank of Canada – Recent Economic Developements by Mark Carney

Here are some eye opening facts about our economy;

Financial markets appear paralysed. You shouldn’t be. These events are like the waves on the sea. The underlying currents—those forces that affect the long-term outlook for our businesses and economy—are much stronger. Today, the charts reveal three major currents: Canadian firms are underexposed to the fastest growing parts of the global economy; commodity prices can be expected to remain elevated relative to historic averages; and our firms are not as productive as they could or need to be.

“As the boomer generation ages, labour force participation rates will decline and hours worked will fall. The direction is clear. The question is merely one of degree.
If we do not develop new markets and if we do not improve productivity, the cumulative loss of income from slower potential growth could be almost $30,000 for every Canadian over the next decade.” -Mark Carney   Read more here;
http://bit.ly/pgDy4i

 

 

Posted in Bank of canada rates, BC Mortgages, Canadian Economy, Canadian Housing Market - Lisa Alentejano, Canadian Mortgage News, Debt, Fixed rates, Kamloops Mortgages, Mortgage Affordability, Mortgage Broker Kamloops, mortgage financing kamloops, new mortgage rules canada, rate fixed mortgage, Real Estate Market

Mark Carney signals long pause in rate hikes

Bank of Canada Governor Mark Carney held his benchmark interest rate at 1 per cent Wednesday and suggested his year-long pause will last much longer as a bleaker outlook for the global economy quashes any urgency to make it harder to borrow and spend.

In explaining the decision to leave borrowing costs alone for an eighth meeting, as expected, the central bank said it believes Canada’se conomy is growing again after stalling in the second quarter, but painted a troubling picture for the United States and Europe, and said exports will be a “major source of weakness.”In light of slowing global economic momentum and heightened financial uncertainty, the need to withdraw monetary policy stimulus has diminished,” the central bank said.

“The Bank will continue to monitor carefully economic and financial developments in the Canadian and global economies, together with the evolution of risks, and set monetary policy consistent with achieving the 2-per-cent inflation target over the medium term.’’

Without doing so explicitly, the central bank also left the door open for an interest-rate cut should the external backdrop deteriorate further, in part by reiterating it is less worried about inflation than just weeks ago when policy makers hinted they might raise rates by the end of the year.

Still, the Canadian dollar made a small gain against the U.S. currency after Mr. Carney’s decision. And economists generally interpreted his language as suggesting he will stay on hold until mid-2012 or later, but reckoned he will eventually need to raise rates if the rebound survives the current turmoil.

“Once again, the tug-of-war between offshore and internal factors is holding the Canadian economy and Bank of Canada policy in limbo,’’ Michael Gregory, a senior economist at BMO Nesbitt Burns, said in a note to clients. “We still judge (as does Carney & Co.) that at least modest growth will resume in(the second half of 2011) and push the Bank’s policy bias back to the tightening side.’’

Policy makers did not include new projections for growth and inflation in their statement, tracking closely to comments Mr. Carney made on Aug. 19, when he appeared with Finance Minister Jim Flaherty before an emergency meeting of the House of Commons finance committee. The recovery has likely resumed, the bank said, after gross domestic product shrank at a 0.4-per-cent annual rate in the second quarter, and growth will be led by business investment and household spending.

However, policy makers said, “lower wealth and incomes will likely moderate the pace of investment and consumption growth,” even as the supply and cost of credit for both businesses and households “remain very stimulative.”

Financial conditions have tightened some and could continue to do so should the global situation worsen, the bank said. Plus, net exports – the difference between what Canadians buy from overseas and what they sell abroad – will be a big drag on the economy, both because of weaker demand around the world and because of “ongoing competitive challenges” like a currency that, while weaker in recent weeks, is still near parity.

Several of the “downside risks” the central bank has identified for the global rebound’s trajectory have come to fruition, policy makers said.

“The global economic outlook has deteriorated in recent weeks,” the bank said. “The European sovereign debt crisis has intensified, a broad range of data has signalled slower global growth, and financial market volatility has increased sharply.’’

The fiscal and financial strains linked to Europe’s crisis have caused upheaval in markets as investors shy away from risk, and “could prompt more severe dislocations” in global markets.

Resolving those strains, the bank said, “will require additional significant initiatives by European authorities,” – an obvious yet significant comment given that in July the central bank said its outlook for the economy at that point assumed that Europe would be able to contain the crisis.

South of the border, Canada’s main export market will see weaker growth than the central bank was anticipating, policy makers said, and household spending “will be even more subdued in the face of high personal debt burdens, large declines in wealth and tough labour market conditions.”

Moreover, the stimulus spending that propped up the U.S. recovery from its worst downturn since the Great Depression will soon give way to restraint and cuts that will undoubtedly crimp U.S. growth.

And although growth in emerging markets like China and India is still “robust” and commodity prices will remain “relatively high,” as those rapidly-expanding economies lift the rest of the world, they too will be affected by sluggishness in the developed world, as consumers and businesses everywhere retrench.

The global recovery’s decline in momentum will keep Canadian inflation in check, the bank said, as energy and food prices ease, wage growth “stays modest” and Canadian companies improve their productivity in the face of the slowdown.

The central bank’s decision comes in a potentially pivotal week that features a bevy of central bank policy meetings, a major speech by U.S. Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke and a nationally televised address by U.S. President Barack Obama before a joint session of Congress, where he is expected to unveil a $300-billion (U.S.) plan to kick-start hiring in the world’s biggest economy.

The week concludes with a gathering of finance ministers and central bankers from the Group of Seven nations in Marseille, France, on Friday and Saturday.

Mr. Carney’s next interest-rate decision is scheduled for Oct. 25, and he will release an updated forecast for the Canadian and global economies the following day.