Posted in Applying for a mortgage - Lisa Alentejano services the interior, Bank VS Broker, BC Mortgages, Canadian Housing Market - Lisa Alentejano, Canadian Mortgage News, Credit Scores, First Time Home Buyer Steps, fixed or variable rate or both, Fixed rates, Hombuyers Downpayment, Home Buyer Closing Costs, Home Loans, Interior home mortgage, Interior Mortgage Expert - Lisa Alentejano, Interior Mortgages, kelowna mortgage, Kelowna Mortgage Broker, Kelowna Mortgage Financing - Lisa Alentejano, Low Interest Rates, Mortgage Affordability, Mortgage by Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Playground - Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Consultant, Mortgage Rates, Protecting your biggest investment your mortgage, rate fixed mortgage, Save your money, Why use a mortgage broker

BANK VS BROKER

Buying your first home and getting your first mortgage can be an overwhelming experience.

If this is your first home buying experiencing, applying for a mortgage can be the most intimidating part of the process , so where do you start?

In the past, the home buyer turned to their banks for their mortgage needs, but now you have more options at your disposal with over 40% of consumers turning to mortgage brokers for their mortgages needs instead of the banks.

Mortgage brokers are provincially licensed and regulated by CMBA .   They can help you with all aspects of a mortgage, from figuring out how much you can truly afford, to determining the best mortgage product for you, to finding ways to save you money and pay off your mortgage faster.

Many lenders’ rates and mortgages can only be accessed through a mortgage broker. Not having the selection of lenders, and simply choosing to get a mortgage with a bank, can mean choosing harsher prepayment penalties for breaking your mortgage in the future, as well as a higher interest rate; which can cost buyers thousands upon thousands of dollars over the life of their mortgage.

A mortgage broker is also able to better tailor a mortgage product to your specific needs, whether that be working with a lender who is more flexible when it comes to self-employed income; one who has more flexible prepayment terms; or one that has more options for consumers that possibly have suffered some credit challenges in the past.  Because mortgage brokers have access to more lenders, they’re better able to find a lender and a mortgage based on your specific needs and financial situation to get you the lowest mortgage rates today.

Mortgage brokers offer convenience, which lets you meet around your schedule, not the banks hours.

Mortgage brokers also operate on commission and are paid by the lenders who ultimately grant you your mortgage, so there is no cost to the consumer.   Referrals are the life blood of our business so it is in our best interest to serve you as best we can.

Bottom line,  using a mortgage broker gives you the freedom of CHOICE and comparables to consider, using a bank gives you no other choice but ONE, theirs.

Feel free to contact me with any questions you may have at 1-888-819-6536 or lisa@mortgageplayground.com

 

Posted in Applying for a mortgage - Lisa Alentejano services the interior, Bank of canada rates, BC Government Loans, BC Mortgages, Canadian Mortgage News, downpayment loans, First Time Home Buyer Steps, Fixed rates, Hombuyers Downpayment, Home Equity, Home Loans, Kelowna Mortgage Broker, Kelowna Mortgage Financing - Lisa Alentejano, Low Interest Rates, Mortgage Affordability, Mortgage by Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Language, Mortgage Playground - Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Consultant

BC First Time Home Buyer Downpayment Loans

save_moneyThere has been a lot of changes with regards to qualifying for a mortgage as of late, but I was happy to see that there is now some relief available for Canadian first time home buyers when it comes to buying a home and  saving for a downpayment.

The BC Government has implemented the BC Home Owner Mortgage and Equity Program granted to Canadian citizens or permanent residents who have never previously owned a property and only apply to homes worth less than $750,000. A buyer must be able to     pre-qualify for a mortgage (that’s where I come in) and have a gross household income of less than $150,000. Applications open Jan. 16, and the program ends March 31, 2020.

The government would put a second mortgage on a property to reflect the amount it loaned, but not require any interest payments or payments on the principal for the first five years. After that, the 20-year repayment plan would be set at the prime lending rate plus 0.5 per cent, leaving the homeowner to pay back both the original mortgage and the down-payment loan at the same time.  There is no restriction to pay the loan out in part or full at any time.

The loans are available for condos, townhouses or detached homes. On a property worth $600,000, the government loan could help a buyer meet or exceed the federally set minimum down payment of $35,000. In one example, provided by B.C. Housing, a person who saved $30,000 could apply to get an additional $30,000 from the province, giving the buyer a $60,000 down payment.

Another example for reference is; as the minimum downpayment requirement is 5%, you, the consumer,  would have to come up with 2.5%, then the government would match the additional 2.5% required to make up the total 5% downpayment.  There are different sources of downpayment to consider as well;  RRSP, Borrowed, gifted from a family member or your own savings.

As always if you’re considering purchasing a home in the near future, the best thing to do is be informed.  My consultations are free and there is no obligation.  If you are simply looking to explore your options or curious and have some questions, please do not hesitate to email me at lisa@mortgageplayground.com or call me toll-free at 1-888-819-6536.

Lisa Alentejano

 

 

 

Posted in Bank of canada rates, Canadian Mortgage News, fixed or variable rate or both, Interior Mortgage Expert - Lisa Alentejano, Kamloops broker, Kelowna Mortgage Financing - Lisa Alentejano, Low Interest Rates

Variable Rates looking good again

With the hike of fixed rates again last week with some of the 5 big banks variable rates are looking attractive with a discount if -40 off prime interest rate currently at 3% making a 5 year variable rate 2.6%.  A 5 year fixed is 3.39-3.79 depending on lender.

Variable rate mortgages are a great option but also come with a few challenges too,  to qualify for a variable rate we must use a higher rate which can impact your borrowing power as well they fluctuate with the Bank of Canada prime lending rate so there definitely is more risk attached.

Best way to know if variable rates are for you is get informed and look at all your options.  Any questions you can call me or email me! 1-888-819-6536 or lisa@mortgageplayground.com.

Cheers

Posted in Bank of Canada, jim flaherty mortgage rules, Low Interest Rates, Mortgage Affordability, Mortgage by Lisa Alentejano, mortgage financing kamloops, mortgage rules, Pre Approval Mortgage, Protecting your biggest investment your mortgage, Why use a mortgage broker

No changes to mortgage rules as of yet… Jim Flaherty left the current regime in place

Investors hoping for a spike in rental demand will be disappointed with the government’s decision to keep mortgage insurance rules as they are — the Finance minister offering a budget that does nothing to tighten qualifying terms for potential homebuyers.

While moving to cut 19,200 bureaucratic jobs over the next three years with an eye toward slashing $5 billion a year from the federal budget, Jim Flaherty left the current regime of mortgage rules in place.

The reprieve, at least for now, was anticipated by mortgage industry leaders from one end of the country to the next, but effectively denies landlords any increase in demand for their units resulting from stricter qualifying standards for homebuyers.

It means rent increases are also unlikely.

With today’s budget announcement, Flaherty effectively rejected a chorus of banker calls for a 25-year amortization cap, down from the 30 years the government now allows. Some economists also wanted the government to increase down payment requires to a minimum 7- or 10-per cent.

Both suggestions were billed as a way of cutting record levels of household debt and slow down the consumer rush to buy homes.

Exactly a week prior to Thursday’s communiqué, Flaherty used a media scrum to suggest he would resist calls for stricter rules.

“I find it a bit off that some of the bank executives are taking the position that the Minister of Finance or the government somehow should tell them how to run their business,” Jim Flaherty told reporters just outside Ottawa Thursday. “They decide what they want to charge in interest rates.

“The new housing market produces a lot of jobs in Canada so there’s a balance that needs to be addressed.”

Still, The government did move to shore up some areas of mortgage industry oversight: it will bring in legislation to provide increased oversight of CMHC commercial activities; and legislation for covered bonds, which will be administered by CMHC.\

 

 

 

Posted in BC Mortgages, BCMortgage, Benchmark interest rate, Best Rate Mortgages, British Columbia Mortgages, buy vs rent for students, Canadian Economy, Canadian Housing Market - Lisa Alentejano, First Time Home Buyer Steps, fixed or variable rate or both, Fixed rates, fixed term mortgages, Hombuyers Downpayment, Home Equity, Interior Mortgages, Jim Flaherty, Kamloops broker, Kamloops mortgage consultant, Low Interest Rates, Mortgage Affordability, Mortgage Rates, new mortgage rules canada, Protecting your biggest investment your mortgage, rate fixed mortgage, Refinance Your Mortgage, Refinancing, Renewing your mortgage, Why use a mortgage broker

TD, RBC End 2.99% Mortgage Deals Early

After a crazy month fielding calls about rates and competitive rates from the major banks, they have put a hault on them.  Although the product that were attached with them were limited and badly disclosed to consumers, there are still amazing rates to be had in the mortgage market.  The problem with banks is that they can choose to give one rate today and a different rate tomorrow.  All I can suggest be informed and do your homework and ask questions when shopping for a mortgage.  Its not always about rate its about having a mortgage plan that suits your needs and someone that can show you ways to save money on your mortgage long term!  If your interested in learning more about how to save money on your mortgage , no tricks no catch good ole information for you from me  http://bit.ly/AfD2RR    Here’s the article below;

After briefly offering record-low rates of less than 3% on some of its mortgages in response to its rivals, Canada’s two biggest banks have pulled back their offers prematurely.

Toronto-Dominion Bank, Canada’s second-largest bank, raised its special four-year closed fixed rate mortgage 40 basis points to 3.39%, effective Wednesday, while also introducing a special five-year closed fixed rate mortgage at 4.04%.

The bank also hiked its five-year closed mortgage 10 basis points to 5.24%.

TD had said it would offer the special rates until Feb. 29.

The moves put TD back in line with Royal Bank of Canada, which made the same rate decisions on Monday, coming into effect Wednesday.

RBC had also initially planned to keep its special rates available until Feb. 29

 

The only difference is RBC already had the special five-year closed fixed rate mortgage product, which it increased 10 basis points to 4.04%.

RBC had first cut its rate to 2.99% in January in response to a similar cut from BMO.

Matt Gierasimczuk, a spokesman with RBC, said the bank had to end its special prematurely because of rising funding costs.

“Our long-term funding costs have gone up considerably due to global economic concerns and, while we have held off in passing on these rate changes to our clients, it is now necessary for us to increase this mortgage rate,” he said in an interview with Bloomberg News on Monday.

With household debt-to-income ratios at at historic highs and still on the rise, the Bank of Canada has repeatedly voiced its concerns over the past year that Canadians are living beyond their means.

“We have expressed on numerous occasions our concerns about rising household indebtedness,” senior deputy governor Tiff Macklem said in a question-and-answer session following a speech in Toronto Tuesday. “The simple fact is that consumers are consuming more than they’re earning.”

With files from Reuters and Bloomberg News

Posted in Applying for a mortgage - Lisa Alentejano services the interior, BC Mortgages, BCMortgage, British Columbia Mortgages, Canadian Housing Market - Lisa Alentejano, Canadian Mortgage News, Debt, Fixed rates, Home Loans, inflation hedge strategy, Interior Mortgages, Kamloops First Time Home Buyer Tips, Kamloops Mortgage Broker - Lisa Alentejano, Kamloops mortgage consultant, kamloops mortgage financing, Kamloops Mortgages, Kelowna Mortgage Broker, Kelowna Mortgage Financing - Lisa Alentejano, Low Interest Rates, Mortgage Affordability, Mortgage Broker Kamloops, Mortgage by Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Consultant Kamloops, mortgage financing kamloops, paying a penalty to break my mortgage, Refinance Your Mortgage, Refinancing, Salmon Arm Mortgage Broker, salmon Arm mortgages, Salmonarm Mortgage, Save your money, Why use a mortgage broker

Calculating your mortgage penalty…

Todays market is bringing alot of questions about whether you should consider refinancing your mortgage for a better rate.  There are many different reasons people might re-negotiate their current mortgage.   You may be considering using some of the equity in your home you have built up and use it to buy a rental property,  Make and RRSP contribution or investment, pay off some high interest rate debt or just renegotiate your current rate for a better more competitive rate and lower monthly payment.

Below are some ways in which you can get a good idea on what kind of penalty you may be faced should you want to refinance your current mortgage.  Again these are used simply as a guideline and are in no way exact.   The lending institution you are currently dealing with will give you the exact amounts relating to your specifac situation.

Calculating Payout Penalties & Interest Rate Differentials (IRD)

Many closed mortgages include a clause stating that the payout privilege on the mortgage will be a three-month interest penalty, or interest differential, whichever is greater.

For the calculations below,  using the following scenario:
  • $300,000 remaining on the mortgage
  • 3 years into a 5-year fixed term at 5.5%
  • Today’s interest rate: 3.5%

We’ll just be using the simple interest amount – the actual amount of the penalty could be a little less than the amount quoted in the examples.

Three Month Interest Penalty :

Mortgage Balance X Interest Rate X 3 months

Plugging in the variables above, we would get:

=   $300,000   X   0.055    X   0.25                (5.5% = 0.055,  3/12 = 0.25)

= $4125.00 would be the 3 month interest penalty

Now we have to calculate the interest differential – and that’s where penalties can be quite substantial – especially since interest rates have dropped considerably lately.

Interest Differential Penalty:

Current Mortgage Balance  X Interest Rate Differencial  X Time remaining

=$300,000 X 0.02  X 2

(0.02 = 2% which is the difference from 5.5%-3.5%, and 2 years left in term)

=$12,000.00 would be the Interest Differential Penalty

In the example above, the bank would then use the Interest Differential Penalty since that amount is the greater of the two. Remember that the way banks calculates their penalties sometimes is a mystery to me and can be greater than the figures above so make sure you ask.

Please remember that its not always about RATE,  although important,  there are other important steps you need to take into consideration when considering paying a penalty and shopping for a mortgage.  Let a mortgage expert, put strategic steps and the right product in place that will ultimately make sure its in your best interest to pay a penalty and that your saving money.

I would also invite you to take a look at this link.  I am part of a community of mortgage brokers that created a forum to get our best ideas together a create a simple and educational strategy  showcased here on this website.    A program I implement with all my clients, wherever they are in the mortgage process.  Its a program created in mind to help consumers pay more attention to their mortgage and implement simple easy steps to save thousands of dollars.   When was the last time  your bank phone you up at any time to show you how to save money on your mortgage.  I think i know the answer…..Please click the link and learn something valuable  today then contact me to get started.

http://www.moneyinyourmortgage.com/af/194/lisaalentejano/about

I am a licensed mortgage broker with years of financial experience,  able to help you with your mortgage  any where in Canada and Alberta. Remember my services are free and never should you feel there is any obligation.   So please pick up the phone and contact me directly I would love to hear from you 1-888-819-6536. If your more comfortable with email please feel free to email me your questions at lisa@mortgageplayground.com

Expert, unbiased advice is what i offer to all of my clients.

Author, Lisa Alentejano

Posted in Bank of Canada, Bank of canada rates, BC Mortgages, Benchmark interest rate, Canadian Economy, Canadian Mortgage News, Jim Flaherty, Kamloops broker, Kamloops Mortgage Broker, Kamloops mortgage consultant, kamloops mortgage financing, Low Interest Rates, mark carney, Mortgage Affordability, Mortgage Broker Kamloops, Protecting your biggest investment your mortgage, Refinance Your Mortgage, should you lock in your mortgage, Why use a mortgage broker

Bank of Canada Hold Key Rate

Best be getting used to this: Mark Carney, governor of the Bank of Canada, has again maintained interest rates at 1% and remains on track to not budge from that position any time soon as upside and downside risks remain balanced amid moderating growth.

This marks the 11th straight time the central bank has held rates at the 1% level, since a 25 basis point increase in September 2010. Since 2000, the bank has employed eight fixed dates a year when it makes decisions on the key rate. Economists expect the bank to keep interest rates at current levels until as late as next year.

The bank’s statement contained a few contradictions: It says the last quarter was stronger than expected, but growth in the future will moderate. Yet the economy will return to capacity quicker than expected.

Huh? Here are the main takeaways from the bank’s statement:

Canada muddles through, more or less

The overall outlook for the Canadian economy remains “little changed” from the bank’s October monetary policy report, with “more momentum than anticipated in the second half of 2011,” but comments Tuesday show a mixed picture with growth “expected to be more modest than previously envisaged.”

On the one hand, the bank has pushed up the schedule for the economy to return to full capacity by one quarter, to the third of 2013, and projects growth of 2.0% in 2012 and 2.8% in 2013 based off 2.4% growth last year. “While the economy appears to be operating with less slack than previously assumed, given the more modest growth profile, the economy is only anticipated to return to full capacity by the third quarter of 2013, one quarter earlier than was expected in October,” he said.

On the other hand, Mr. Carney expects the pace of growth to be more modest than previously thought, largely due to outside factors. “Prolonged uncertainty about the global economic and financial environment is likely to dampen the rate of growth of business investment … Net exports are expected to contribute little to growth, reflecting moderate foreign demand and ongoing competitiveness challenges, including the persistent strength of the Canadian dollar,” he said. Of note, the loonie spiked to a two-week high against the greenback earlier Tuesday.

Household debt still a problem

“Very favourable financing conditions are expected to buttress consumer spending and housing activity,” he said. “Household expenditures are expected to remain high relative to GDP and the ratio of household debt to income is projected to rise further.” The Bank of Canada has been harping on this for a while, but the conditions created by the lengthy low interest rate environment have led Canadians to borrow and spend. Debt-to-income ratios have hit repeated record highs in the past few years, and the trend is expected to continue.

If not hawkish, at least less dovish

The outlook for inflation remains stable for now, with dynamics similar to those in October, but Mr. Carney characterized the inflation profile as “marginally firmer.” Inflation is expected to slow in 2012, before rising again to 2% in the third quarter of 2013 as excess supply is absorbed, wages grow modestly and expectations remain anchored. “Several significant upside and downside risks are present in the inflation outlook for Canada. Overall, the bank judges that these risks are roughly balanced over the projection horizon,” he said.

Europe: Still a big mess

“The sovereign debt crisis in Europe has intensified, conditions in international financial markets have tightened and risk aversion has risen,” Mr. Carney said. “The bank continues to assume that European authorities will implement sufficient measures to contain the crisis, although this assumption is clearly subject to downside risks.” Children, of course, already know the schoolyard rhyme about what happens to “U and Me” when you assume anything.

The rest of the world: Not much better

“The outlook for the global economy has deteriorated and uncertainty has increased,” the bank said. In the United States, while the GDP rebound in the second half of the year was a welcome surprise, the bank remains bearish on the pace of growth in 2012 due to household deleveraging, fiscal consolidation and spillover from Europe. Chinese growth is also slowing as expected, to a more sustainable pace. Commodity prices, except oil, are expected to be below levels forecasted last October at least through to 2013.

Financial Post