Posted in Applying for a mortgage - Lisa Alentejano services the interior, Bank VS Broker, BC Mortgages, Canadian Housing Market - Lisa Alentejano, Canadian Mortgage News, Credit Scores, First Time Home Buyer Steps, fixed or variable rate or both, Fixed rates, Hombuyers Downpayment, Home Buyer Closing Costs, Home Loans, Interior home mortgage, Interior Mortgage Expert - Lisa Alentejano, Interior Mortgages, kelowna mortgage, Kelowna Mortgage Broker, Kelowna Mortgage Financing - Lisa Alentejano, Low Interest Rates, Mortgage Affordability, Mortgage by Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Playground - Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Consultant, Mortgage Rates, Protecting your biggest investment your mortgage, rate fixed mortgage, Save your money, Why use a mortgage broker

BANK VS BROKER

Buying your first home and getting your first mortgage can be an overwhelming experience.

If this is your first home buying experiencing, applying for a mortgage can be the most intimidating part of the process , so where do you start?

In the past, the home buyer turned to their banks for their mortgage needs, but now you have more options at your disposal with over 40% of consumers turning to mortgage brokers for their mortgages needs instead of the banks.

Mortgage brokers are provincially licensed and regulated by CMBA .   They can help you with all aspects of a mortgage, from figuring out how much you can truly afford, to determining the best mortgage product for you, to finding ways to save you money and pay off your mortgage faster.

Many lenders’ rates and mortgages can only be accessed through a mortgage broker. Not having the selection of lenders, and simply choosing to get a mortgage with a bank, can mean choosing harsher prepayment penalties for breaking your mortgage in the future, as well as a higher interest rate; which can cost buyers thousands upon thousands of dollars over the life of their mortgage.

A mortgage broker is also able to better tailor a mortgage product to your specific needs, whether that be working with a lender who is more flexible when it comes to self-employed income; one who has more flexible prepayment terms; or one that has more options for consumers that possibly have suffered some credit challenges in the past.  Because mortgage brokers have access to more lenders, they’re better able to find a lender and a mortgage based on your specific needs and financial situation to get you the lowest mortgage rates today.

Mortgage brokers offer convenience, which lets you meet around your schedule, not the banks hours.

Mortgage brokers also operate on commission and are paid by the lenders who ultimately grant you your mortgage, so there is no cost to the consumer.   Referrals are the life blood of our business so it is in our best interest to serve you as best we can.

Bottom line,  using a mortgage broker gives you the freedom of CHOICE and comparables to consider, using a bank gives you no other choice but ONE, theirs.

Feel free to contact me with any questions you may have at 1-888-819-6536 or lisa@mortgageplayground.com

 

Posted in advice on locking in your mortgage, Bank of Canada, Bank of canada rates, BC Mortgages, Benchmark interest rate, Canadian Mortgage News, fixed or variable rate or both, Fixed rates, fixed term mortgages, Home Loans, Interest \rate Increases, Interior Mortgage Expert - Lisa Alentejano, kelowna mortgage, Kelowna Mortgage Broker, Kelowna Mortgage Financing - Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Rates, Pre Approval Mortgage, rate fixed mortgage

FIXED VS VARIABLE MORTGAGES

THINGS TO CONSIDER

Fixed and Variable rate mortgages both have their advantages and disadvantages!

Historically speaking, homeowners tend to pay lower rates with variable mortgages, but these mortgages are also vulnerable to fluctuations because they’re tied to the Bank
of Canada’s prime rate (which is announced eight times per year). Fixed rates, on the other hand are primarily influenced by the yield on Canadian government bonds (bond yields) , and are typically higher than variable rates, but their rate is consistent throughout the term of the mortgage. Below are a few questions to help you determine which type
of mortgage is right for you.

CAN I AFFORD TO TAKE A VARIABLE RATE MORTGAGE

There is some risk associated with variable rate mortgages, so if  you go this route, you must be able to mitigate the risk if rates do rise.  One method of protecting yourself involves setting your payment to a fixed amount that’s higher than the minimum requirement.  For example, setting your payments based on the current 5 year fixed rate will allow you to provide a buffer in the event that rates rise and, because you’re paying more than the minimum amount, you’ll be paying more of your principal as well.

DOES A VARIABLE RATE MORTGAGE FIT MY RISK PROFILE?

Once you have decided you can afford a variable rate mortgage,  the next thing to assess is whether a variable rate mortgage fits your personality, lifestyle and comfort zone. If you’re the type of person that can’t sleep at night knowing that your rate and payment may change by 0.25%, then a variable rate mortgage may not be the best option for you.

WHAT TYPE OF VARIABLE RATE MORTGAGE SHOULD I CHOOSE?

There are three main factors to consider when choosing a variable rate mortgage:

  1. Payment frequency – Make sure you are aware of the options available before deciding. Some lenders may not allow certain variations of payment frequency (i.e.accelerated biweekly or weekly payments).
  2. Rate changes – Some lenders change their variable rates in line with the Bank of Canada eight times per year while others do it quarterly.
  3. Conversion to fixed rate – Does the lender allow the mortgage to be converted to a fixed rate mortgage at anytime? If so, what rate are you guaranteed on conversion – the best discounted rate or the posted rate?

If you would like to discuss all of your options in detail please contact me directly at 250-819-6536 or 1-888-819-6536 or email me at lisa@mortgageplayground.com

Lisa Alentejano

Posted in Applying for a mortgage - Lisa Alentejano services the interior, Bank of canada rates, BC Government Loans, BC Mortgages, Canadian Mortgage News, downpayment loans, First Time Home Buyer Steps, Fixed rates, Hombuyers Downpayment, Home Equity, Home Loans, Kelowna Mortgage Broker, Kelowna Mortgage Financing - Lisa Alentejano, Low Interest Rates, Mortgage Affordability, Mortgage by Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Language, Mortgage Playground - Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Consultant

BC First Time Home Buyer Downpayment Loans

save_moneyThere has been a lot of changes with regards to qualifying for a mortgage as of late, but I was happy to see that there is now some relief available for Canadian first time home buyers when it comes to buying a home and  saving for a downpayment.

The BC Government has implemented the BC Home Owner Mortgage and Equity Program granted to Canadian citizens or permanent residents who have never previously owned a property and only apply to homes worth less than $750,000. A buyer must be able to     pre-qualify for a mortgage (that’s where I come in) and have a gross household income of less than $150,000. Applications open Jan. 16, and the program ends March 31, 2020.

The government would put a second mortgage on a property to reflect the amount it loaned, but not require any interest payments or payments on the principal for the first five years. After that, the 20-year repayment plan would be set at the prime lending rate plus 0.5 per cent, leaving the homeowner to pay back both the original mortgage and the down-payment loan at the same time.  There is no restriction to pay the loan out in part or full at any time.

The loans are available for condos, townhouses or detached homes. On a property worth $600,000, the government loan could help a buyer meet or exceed the federally set minimum down payment of $35,000. In one example, provided by B.C. Housing, a person who saved $30,000 could apply to get an additional $30,000 from the province, giving the buyer a $60,000 down payment.

Another example for reference is; as the minimum downpayment requirement is 5%, you, the consumer,  would have to come up with 2.5%, then the government would match the additional 2.5% required to make up the total 5% downpayment.  There are different sources of downpayment to consider as well;  RRSP, Borrowed, gifted from a family member or your own savings.

As always if you’re considering purchasing a home in the near future, the best thing to do is be informed.  My consultations are free and there is no obligation.  If you are simply looking to explore your options or curious and have some questions, please do not hesitate to email me at lisa@mortgageplayground.com or call me toll-free at 1-888-819-6536.

Lisa Alentejano

 

 

 

Posted in Applying for a mortgage - Lisa Alentejano services the interior, BC Mortgages, BCMortgage, British Columbia Mortgages, Canadian Housing Market - Lisa Alentejano, Canadian Mortgage News, Debt, Fixed rates, Home Loans, inflation hedge strategy, Interior Mortgages, Kamloops First Time Home Buyer Tips, Kamloops Mortgage Broker - Lisa Alentejano, Kamloops mortgage consultant, kamloops mortgage financing, Kamloops Mortgages, Kelowna Mortgage Broker, Kelowna Mortgage Financing - Lisa Alentejano, Low Interest Rates, Mortgage Affordability, Mortgage Broker Kamloops, Mortgage by Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Consultant Kamloops, mortgage financing kamloops, paying a penalty to break my mortgage, Refinance Your Mortgage, Refinancing, Salmon Arm Mortgage Broker, salmon Arm mortgages, Salmonarm Mortgage, Save your money, Why use a mortgage broker

Calculating your mortgage penalty…

Todays market is bringing alot of questions about whether you should consider refinancing your mortgage for a better rate.  There are many different reasons people might re-negotiate their current mortgage.   You may be considering using some of the equity in your home you have built up and use it to buy a rental property,  Make and RRSP contribution or investment, pay off some high interest rate debt or just renegotiate your current rate for a better more competitive rate and lower monthly payment.

Below are some ways in which you can get a good idea on what kind of penalty you may be faced should you want to refinance your current mortgage.  Again these are used simply as a guideline and are in no way exact.   The lending institution you are currently dealing with will give you the exact amounts relating to your specifac situation.

Calculating Payout Penalties & Interest Rate Differentials (IRD)

Many closed mortgages include a clause stating that the payout privilege on the mortgage will be a three-month interest penalty, or interest differential, whichever is greater.

For the calculations below,  using the following scenario:
  • $300,000 remaining on the mortgage
  • 3 years into a 5-year fixed term at 5.5%
  • Today’s interest rate: 3.5%

We’ll just be using the simple interest amount – the actual amount of the penalty could be a little less than the amount quoted in the examples.

Three Month Interest Penalty :

Mortgage Balance X Interest Rate X 3 months

Plugging in the variables above, we would get:

=   $300,000   X   0.055    X   0.25                (5.5% = 0.055,  3/12 = 0.25)

= $4125.00 would be the 3 month interest penalty

Now we have to calculate the interest differential – and that’s where penalties can be quite substantial – especially since interest rates have dropped considerably lately.

Interest Differential Penalty:

Current Mortgage Balance  X Interest Rate Differencial  X Time remaining

=$300,000 X 0.02  X 2

(0.02 = 2% which is the difference from 5.5%-3.5%, and 2 years left in term)

=$12,000.00 would be the Interest Differential Penalty

In the example above, the bank would then use the Interest Differential Penalty since that amount is the greater of the two. Remember that the way banks calculates their penalties sometimes is a mystery to me and can be greater than the figures above so make sure you ask.

Please remember that its not always about RATE,  although important,  there are other important steps you need to take into consideration when considering paying a penalty and shopping for a mortgage.  Let a mortgage expert, put strategic steps and the right product in place that will ultimately make sure its in your best interest to pay a penalty and that your saving money.

I would also invite you to take a look at this link.  I am part of a community of mortgage brokers that created a forum to get our best ideas together a create a simple and educational strategy  showcased here on this website.    A program I implement with all my clients, wherever they are in the mortgage process.  Its a program created in mind to help consumers pay more attention to their mortgage and implement simple easy steps to save thousands of dollars.   When was the last time  your bank phone you up at any time to show you how to save money on your mortgage.  I think i know the answer…..Please click the link and learn something valuable  today then contact me to get started.

http://www.moneyinyourmortgage.com/af/194/lisaalentejano/about

I am a licensed mortgage broker with years of financial experience,  able to help you with your mortgage  any where in Canada and Alberta. Remember my services are free and never should you feel there is any obligation.   So please pick up the phone and contact me directly I would love to hear from you 1-888-819-6536. If your more comfortable with email please feel free to email me your questions at lisa@mortgageplayground.com

Expert, unbiased advice is what i offer to all of my clients.

Author, Lisa Alentejano

Posted in BC Mortgages, Canadian Mortgage News, Fixed rates, fixed term mortgages, Interior home mortgage, Kamloops First Time Home Buyer Tips, Kamloops Mortgage Broker, Kamloops Mortgage Broker - Lisa Alentejano, Kamloops mortgage consultant, kamloops mortgage financing, Kamloops Mortgages, Kelowna Mortgage Broker, Low Interest Rates, Mortgage Broker Kamloops, Mortgage Consultant Kamloops, mortgage financing kamloops, Mortgage Playground - Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Consultant, Mortgage Rates, Mortgages - Get a second opinion, Protecting your biggest investment your mortgage, Refinance Your Mortgage, Refinancing, Renewing your mortgage, Save your money, Vancouver Mortgages, Why use a mortgage broker

Do your homework first… read the fine print – Rate of 2.99 to good to be true?

Although you will never hear any bank say that publicly, this is what is going on. Recently there has been some industry chatter about a few banks offering a sub 3% 5 year fixed product. One particular institution is bragging about their 6 billion dollar portfolio under administration, this product, and how great it is. At first glance you might think ” WOW, that’s awesome!” However as with all mortgages, you have to dig a bit deeper to find out the real nuts and bolts of this sub 3% offer. It’s a great offer alright for the bank, not for you; the consumer.

Based on an average mortgage size of $250,000, that’s 24,000 Canadians that negotiated directly with the bank who will feel ripped off once they find out about their terms and conditions. I am very pro client / consumer, and my job is to look out for their best interests so I simply can’t endorse this product. Consumers though need to know why they shouldn’t either. This product is priced well below the market average for 5 year product, and does not come without it’s “catches”. It’s definitely buyer beware and the bank will not tell you this.

Some of the features (or non-features you might say) are:

Minimal or no pre-payment privileges

This product has extremely low pre-payment features. On a monthly increase basis this could mean nothing to less than half of what the industry norm is. Lump sum payments may also be nothing or less than half the industry norm and if allowed only once per year. Pre-payment features are extremely beneficial and allow for strategies to be put in place. Lack of strategy means lack of interest savings for clients and consumers.

Fully Closed

When I say fully closed, I mean just that. A borrower cannot get out of the mortgage, unless they sell their place if at all. Who wants to sell their place if they want to refinance? I don’t know too many people that would. If borrowers do sell their place, a substantial penalty such as a 6 month interest penalty typically applies.  Borrowers may be offered  a reduced penalty (3 month) if they choose to refinance with that same bank however this still does not offer a borrower access to the entire mortgage market. It also confines them to more inferior product. If a borrower is going to pay a penalty, they rightfully should have the opportunity to entertain superior product. The average mortgage is in place roughly 3 years before being paid out or refinanced. Life just happens. More than likely a borrower will need to do something with their mortgage during their current mortgage term.  To be locked down by these terms and clauses makes absolutely no sense.

No guarantee of best rates upon renewal or refinance

Banks know that consumers may not know the mortgage market at any particular point in time. What’s happening in the mortgage world is usually not on the forefront of people’s minds. When it comes time to renew or refinance borrowers can be offered a rate as high as 1% above the market norm and not realize it. When a borrower asks the bank to do better, they may be offered a discount further however that .5% “special” discount doesn’t look so good when the rest of the market is priced much lower. This amounts to more interest the borrower has to pay over the course of their mortgage. This is more money for the bank that should be staying with you.

Your mortgage will also be registered as a collateral charge.

Beware of this one as it is a very sly practice among banks. What does a collateral charge mean to a borrower? The bank will instruct the lawyer to register the title as a running account. More than likely you running account will have a global limit of the property value itself. This doesn’t mean you are going to get this money, it just means that your property is fully tied up. If you choose another lender at renewal, legal fees apply. A second mortgage or Line of Credit can’t be put behind this product because the bank has tied up ALL of your equity. No matter which way you turn, the bank has shackled you to more costs and fees.

The lesson here is that rate is not everything. Product and Strategy is. Borrowers need flexible product to execute strategy.

Contact me for more information or apply online at http://www.mortgageplayground.com

 

 

Posted in Bank of Canada, Bank of canada rates, BC Mortgages, British Columbia Mortgages, Canadian Economy, Canadian Mortgage News, Interest \rate Increases, Kamloops home mortgages, kamloops mortgage, Kamloops Mortgage Broker, Kamloops Mortgages, Kelowna Mortgage Broker, Kelowna Mortgage Financing - Lisa Alentejano, Low Interest Rates, mark carney, Mortgage Affordability, Mortgage by Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Playground - Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Consultant, Mortgage Rates

No BoC rate hike until Q1 2013: poll

No BOC rate hike until Q1 2013

A deteriorating European economy and weak global growth will keep the Bank of Canada from raising rates for at least another year, though an interest rate cut looks highly unlikely, according to a Reuters survey.

The Reuters poll of 41 economists and strategists released on Tuesday showed the median forecast for the next interest rate hike was pushed back by three months to the first quarter of 2013 from the fourth quarter of 2012 projected in a November poll. The Bank of Canada’s target for the overnight rate — its main policy rate — has been at 1% for more than a year.

“The longer we spend struggling with slower growth and the longer we go without the Europeans coming to some cohesive policy solution, the worse the economic drag will be,” said David Tulk, chief Canada macro strategist at TD Securities.

“You get the sense that growth I think is likely to remain lower for longer, just like interest rates.”

Investors in the first quarter of 2012 are expected to focus on the heavy supply of eurozone debt coming due, with fears about a possible lack of demand at auctions. Italian and Spanish bond sales in particular are viewed as the next big tests.

 

Some Canadian economic data has also been worrisome. A Bank of Canada business survey on Monday showed an increasing number of firms are pessimistic about the rate of sales growth, further reducing pressure for the central bank to take interest rates higher.

The most recent domestic jobs report also disappointed, reversing a trend that saw Canada outperform the United States both during and after the global financial crisis.
Monthly employment data on Friday showed Canada missed forecasts while the U.S. beat them. This gives the Bank of Canada even less impetus to tighten policy before the U.S. Federal Reserve, which has said it expects to keep its key interest rate near zero through mid-2013.

But many analysts expect an even longer pause, and bet the Fed’s next move will be to stimulate the economy, rather than tighten monetary policy.

“If the Fed comes out with its published interest rate forecast at the end of the month and says the consensus points to an even longer hold than the middle of 2013 then that could handicap the Bank of Canada to an even greater extent,” said Derek Holt, vice president of economics at Scotia Capital.

Yet many analysts say the case for an interest rate cut is difficult. Governor Mark Carney has repeatedly warned about the dangers of Canadians borrowing too much as a result of very low interest rates. Data last month showed the level of household debt swelled to another record high in the third quarter.

“A cut in the policy rate anytime in 2012 is extremely unlikely. It would take a global recession of 2008 proportions for the BoC to even consider cutting policy rates,” said Carlos Leitao, chief economist at Laurentian Bank Securities in Montreal. “In our view, 1% is the new, effective, zero-bound.”

Of the 41 contributors, 35 see a rate hike happening after the second quarter of 2012. Five forecasters — BNP Paribas, Capital Economics, Goldman Sachs, IFR Markets and ING Financial — predicted a rate cut across the forecast horizon, up from only three forecasters in the last poll. All five expect the cut by mid-2012.

The possibility of an ease has been anticipated in overnight index swaps for some time, though the timing has been pushed out.

Forecasts for official interest rates at the end of 2012 also dropped from the previous poll — with the median target declining to 1%, from 1.25% in November — indicating one less rate increase next year than was previously assumed.

Interest rate expectations for the four quarters of 2012 have been downgraded continuously in all nine global Reuters polls conducted since last January, with the target for the first quarter of 2012 revised down to 1% from 2.25%.

The poll showed a 99% probability there won’t be a change in rates at the next policy announcement on Jan 17.

 

© Thomson Rerters 2012

Posted in BC Assessment values, British Columbia Mortgages, Canadian Economy, Canadian Mortgage News, Home Equity, Home Loans, Kamloops broker, Kamloops home mortgages, kamloops mortgage, Kamloops mortgage consultant, kamloops mortgage financing, Kamloops Mortgages, Kelowna Mortgage Broker, Mortgage Affordability, Mortgage by Lisa Alentejano, mortgage financing kamloops, Mortgage Playground - Lisa Alentejano, Mortgage Consultant

BC Assessment Sends Out 10,000 Extreme Value Change Letters for 2012

A majority of homeowners in British Columbia won’t know what has happened to their property value over the past year until they receive their annual BC Assessment notice in early January 2012.

Each year, BC Assessment sends out Property Assessment Notices on December 31 for nearly two million properties in British Columbia. Local real estate sales determine the property values that BC Assessment reports based on a market value approach with a July 1 valuation date.

However, some BC property owners have received an early indication of what to expect when BC Assessment releases their 2012 Assessment Roll figures on Tuesday, January 3, 2012.

On December 5, 2011, BC Assessment sent out approximately 10,000 “Extreme Value Change” information letters to BC property owners where the assessed value of their property increased by 30% or more above their local area.

These BCA information letters are sent to property owners as part of the pre-roll consultation process for significant value change where the assessed value of a property increases more than the average increase in an area.

“Generally speaking, for property owners whose 2012 assessments have increased 30% or more above the average increase for their local community, we have provided advanced letters informing them of this change,” said Tim Morrison, Communications Coordinator for BC Assessment, in an interview with BuyRIC.com.

“For example, if the average market increase for a specific property type within a specific jurisdiction was 5% and your property increase was 35% or higher, then you would likely receive an advanced letter.”

This advanced information indicates that approximately 10,000 BC property owners across the province will see a 30% or higher than average increase in their 2012 assessment notices.

The most significant 2012 property assessment increases in British Columbia occurred in Vancouver. BC Assessment sent out approximately 1,800 of these “Extreme Value Change” letters to Vancouver property owners and approximately 800 to the North Shore, including West Vancouver and North Vancouver property owners.

BC Assessment 2012 Roll - Extreme Value Change Property Letters

Morrison added, “We provide impacted property owners with advanced notification in order to make them aware that the change will likely result in an increase in their 2012 property taxes as determined by their local municipality.”

“We want to ensure that people know that they can contact us, so that we can work with them in explaining our market analysis techniques used to assess their properties.”

BC Assessment serves to ensure accurate, fair, and equitable annual assessments throughout British Columbia. Local governments and other taxing authorities are responsible for property taxation and, after determining their own budget needs in the spring, will decide their property tax rates based on the assessment roll for their jurisdiction.

These “Extreme Value Change” information letters are part of BC Assessments “no surprises” focus to engage BC property owners and local governments on changes that might have a big impact on property valuations.

Ongoing audits, reviews, and market analyses are part of BC Assessment’s quality assurance commitment to property owners.