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Canadian Mortgage News

How too Calculate a Mortgage Penalty

Todays market is bringing alot of questions about whether you should consider refinancing your mortgage for a better rate.  There are many different reasons people might re-negotiate their current mortgage.   You may be considering using some of the equity in your home you have built up and use it to buy a rental property,  Make and RRSP contribution or investment, pay off some high interest rate debt or just renegotiate your current rate for a better more competitive rate and lower monthly payment.

Below are some ways in which you can get a good idea on what kind of penalty you may be faced should you want to refinance your current mortgage.  Again these are used simply as a guideline and are in no way exact.   The lending institution you are currently dealing with will give you the exact amounts relating to your specifac situation.  BUT not all lending institutions are the same and the way they calculate their penalties, I can say from what Ive seen some of the Big 5 Banks are some of the worst…

Calculating Payout Penalties & Interest Rate Differentials (IRD)

Many closed mortgages include a clause stating that the payout privilege on the mortgage will be a three-month interest penalty, or interest differential, whichever is greater.

For the calculations below,  using the following scenario:
  • $300,000 remaining on the mortgage
  • 3 years into a 5-year fixed term at 5.5%
  • Today’s interest rate: 3.5%

We’ll just be using the simple interest amount – the actual amount of the penalty could be a little less than the amount quoted in the examples.

Three Month Interest Penalty :

Mortgage Balance X Interest Rate X 3 months

Plugging in the variables above, we would get:

=   $300,000   X   0.055    X   0.25                (5.5% = 0.055,  3/12 = 0.25)

$4125.00 would be the 3 month interest penalty

Now we have to calculate the interest differential – and that’s where penalties can be quite substantial – especially since interest rates have dropped considerably lately.

Interest Differential Penalty:

Current Mortgage Balance  X Interest Rate Differencial  X Time remaining

=$300,000 X 0.02  X 2

(0.02 = 2% which is the difference from 5.5%-3.5%, and 2 years left in term)

=$12,000.00 would be the Interest Differential Penalty

In the example above, the bank would then use the Interest Differential Penalty since that amount is the greater of the two. Remember that the way banks calculates their penalties sometimes is a mystery to me and can be greater than the figures above so make sure you ask.

Please remember that its not always about RATE,  although important,  there are other important steps you need to take into consideration when considering paying a penalty and shopping for a mortgage.  Let a mortgage expert, put strategic steps and the right product in place that will ultimately make sure its in your best interest to pay a penalty and that your saving money.

I would also invite you to take a look at this link.  I am part of a community of mortgage brokers that created a forum to get our best ideas together a create a simple and educational strategy  showcased here on this website.    A program I implement with all my clients, wherever they are in the mortgage process.  Its a program created in mind to help consumers pay more attention to their mortgage and implement simple easy steps to save thousands of dollars.   When was the last time  your bank phone you up at any time to show you how to save money on your mortgage.  I think i know the answer…..Please click the link and learn something valuable  today then contact me to get started.

http://www.moneyinyourmortgage.com/af/194/lisaalentejano/about

I am a licensed mortgage broker with years of financial experience,  able to help you with your mortgage  any where in Canada and Alberta. Remember my services are free and never should you feel there is any obligation.   So please pick up the phone and contact me directly I would love to hear from you 1-888-819-6536. If your more comfortable with email please feel free to email me your questions at lisa@mortgageplayground.com

Expert, unbiased advice is what i offer to all of my clients.

 

Lisa_signature_2013

March 24, 2014 Posted by | Applying for a mortgage - Lisa Alentejano services the interior, British Columbia Mortgages, calculate your mortgage penalty, Canadian Economy, Home Loans, Interest \rate Increases, Interior home mortgage, Kamloops Mortgages, Kelowna Mortgage Broker, mortgage penalty, Mortgage Rates, mortgage rules | Leave a comment

Prepay your mortgage – retire without a mortgage?

save_moneyI came across this information and thought it was worth a share.  Its scares me to think of retiring with a mortgage and if your making minimum payments on a long term mortgage, it should scare you.
The stats are no joke:
  • 43% of 55 year olds say they haven’t saved enough for retirement.
  • 50% of Canadians believe they’ll run out of money within 10 years of retiring.
  • 1 in 4 retirees bear the load of a mortgage.
  • 51% of today’s borrowers expect to carry a mortgage into retirement.

Imagine the trauma of depleting your savings, being without full-time income, and still having a mortgage payment. For some, it’s a doomsday financial scenario.

Luckily, there is a straightforward New Year’s resolution that can help forestall this outcome:

 Increasing one’s mortgage payments.

You don’t need to raise them by much. For someone with 20 years left on a mortgage, for example:

  • A 2% annual payment increase will retire that mortgage 3.6 years sooner
  • A 3.5% annual payment increase will retire it 5.3 years sooner
  • A 5% annual payment increase will end it 6.7 years sooner

(Assumes a static 3.49% interest rate for simplicity.)

Every extra $1 of principal that you pay down today saves a minimum of $1 in interest over a typical mortgage lifespan.

So, while you’re making New Year’s pledges to exercise more, eat better or the like, consider a resolution that dramatically improves your financial health. If you don’t have a better use of your free cash flow (i.e., you don’t have higher yielding investments, higher interest debt to pay off, etc.) then take a step towards the peace of mind of owning your home free and clear. Do what 60%of Canadian mortgagors never do, and voluntarily raise your mortgage payments.

For more information about your mortgage please feel free to call me at 1-888-819-6536.

Lisa Alentejano

February 3, 2014 Posted by | Canadian Mortgage News | Leave a comment

Variable Rates looking good again

With the hike of fixed rates again last week with some of the 5 big banks variable rates are looking attractive with a discount if -40 off prime interest rate currently at 3% making a 5 year variable rate 2.6%.  A 5 year fixed is 3.39-3.79 depending on lender.

Variable rate mortgages are a great option but also come with a few challenges too,  to qualify for a variable rate we must use a higher rate which can impact your borrowing power as well they fluctuate with the Bank of Canada prime lending rate so there definitely is more risk attached.

Best way to know if variable rates are for you is get informed and look at all your options.  Any questions you can call me or email me! 1-888-819-6536 or lisa@mortgageplayground.com.

Cheers

August 25, 2013 Posted by | Bank of canada rates, Canadian Mortgage News, fixed or variable rate or both, Interior Mortgage Expert - Lisa Alentejano, Kamloops broker, Kelowna Mortgage Financing - Lisa Alentejano, Low Interest Rates | Leave a comment

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